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health equity

Black History Month 2014 Is Ending, But Health Disparities Continue

Posted by Midwives Alliance on February 25th, 2014

Opportunities to make change year round

During the month of February, MANA has been highlighting birth workers of color and their role in improving outcomes for mothers and babies.

Although Black History Month ends this week, the impacts of health disparities in the U.S. continue year round.

MANA would like to bring attention to one national effort to create health equity: scholarships for birth workers of color.

The Birth Workers of Color Scholarship "Grand Challenge" is asking every midwifery program in the U.S. to offer one scholarship per year to women of color. As the site says:

"A midwife for every woman. That is our grand ideal. But what if you are a woman of color in America, where is your midwife from your unique culture?"

If you operate a midwifery training organization, please consider adding a scholarship today. For all of us there are many ways to get involved:

  • Raise awareness. Share the site widely and call on the organization that trained you to offer a scholarship.
  • Offer your assistance as a mentor or preceptor.
  • Offer scholarships for workshops or other trainings you provide.

This project is being spearheaded by Claudia Booker, CPM, Jennie Joseph, CPM, LM and Vicki Penwell, CPM, LM. Learn more at the Birth Workers of Color Scholarship site here.

Educate yourself and your community on maternal child health disparity in the U.S.

When the Bough Breaks free viewings extended for 2014.

To honor Black History Month in 2013 MANA created the opportunity for members, friends, and the community at large to have free access to When The Bough Breaks, a groundbreaking documentary that explores why black babies in the U.S. are more than twice as likely to die, be born too soon, or too small.

MANA has extended this opportunity for 2014. To learn more, email socialjustice@mana.org today.

Presenting and Honoring: Fatima Muhammad, MPH, of Phoenix, AZ

Posted by Midwives Alliance on February 24th, 2014

Celebrating Black History Month

Fatima Muhammad, MPH, is the Director of the new Tanner Community Development Corporation’s Birthing Project, based in Phoenix, Arizona. The mission of the TCDC Birthing Project is: "To empower our families with quality education, skills, and support that promote conscious conception, positive birth experiences and outcomes, resulting in healthy and nurturing parenting practices." Fatima began her journey in Maternal and Child Health as a doula in Tucson, AZ. A few months later she was offered a position at the Phoenix Birthing Project. While there, she worked to decrease high infant mortality rates in the African American community through training Arizona’s first group of Community based doulas, facilitating parenting classes and providing psychosocial support to African American pregnant and parenting families.

In addition to being the Director of TCDC's Birthing Project, Fatima continues her maternal and child health work as a midwifery student. "Becoming a midwife allows me the opportunity to provide quality healthcare services to our families. I believe getting back to our traditional birth practices is key to empowering, preserving and strengthening our community. I plan on practicing the best possible midwifery on all levels; mentally, physically, spiritually and skillfully, resulting in optimal birth outcomes," said Fatima. "My biggest challenges in this work thus far have been funding and finishing my midwifery license. These are no longer obstacles. I realize we are the ones we have been waiting for and no one can serve our community better than we can to improve our state of health."

When asked who her heroes are, Fatima responded, "My 'shero' is my mother. She knew how to make a way out of no way. Her love was so nurturing that it surpassed all of our hardships. My mother always reminded me that I could be or do anything! She taught me about strength, my power, and to value the gifts the Creator has given me as well to help others through the use of my gifts."

For more information on how to assist the TCDC Birthing Project please visit www.tcdccorp.org, or call 602.253.6904.

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