Blog

Author: 
Courtney L. Everson PhD
Marit Bovbjerg PhD, MS
Melissa Cheyney PhD, CPM, LDM

A new study on the safety of waterbirth was released in the Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health on January 20, 2016, authored by MANA Division of Research Coordinator Council members, Drs. Marit Bovbjerg, Melissa Cheyney, and Courtney Everson. This study used data from the MANA Stats project (2004 to 2009) and reported on neonatal and maternal outcomes for 6,534 babies born underwater in home and birth center settings.

Author: 
Katelyn Edel

My name is Katelyn Edel, and I am the new intern for the Department of Research, where I work closely with Bruce Ackerman, Jen Brown, and Sarita Bennett. 

Author: 
Marit Bovbjerg PhD, MS
Jill Breen CPM, CLC
Melissa Cheyney PhD, CPM, LDM
Justine Clegg MS, LM, CPM
Courtney L. Everson PhD
Jeanette McCulloch, IBCLC
Nasima Pfaffl MA

Largest Study on Waterbirth Finds No Harm to Babies

New Position Statement Compiles Waterbirth Research for Families, Providers

Author: 
Jill Breen CPM, CLC

The MANA and CfM Joint Position Statement on Water Immersion During Labor and Birth is a position paper written for a broad audience including midwives and other birthcare professionals, consumers, doulas, childbirth educators, and policy makers. It is co-authored by the Midwives Alliance of North America and Citizens for Midwifery.

Author: 
Nicole White, CPM

Hello MANA members and friends,

I am your Director of Events, Nicole Marie White, CPM. I am from Michigan and currently working as a member of the Coalition to License Certified Professional Midwives in Michigan. We just passed the house in December!

In the past month, two new studies have been released - one in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the other in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) - examining out-of-hospital birth outcomes. The CMAJ study examined 2006-09 provincial health records while the NEJM study analyzed two years of Oregon vital statistics data.

Author: 
Courtney L. Everson PhD

We hear the terms “evidence-based practice” (EBP) or “evidence-informed practice” (EIP) used often in the healthcare world, being cited as an expected and central component of high-quality care delivery. But what do these terms really mean? There is a misconception that in EBP/EIP approaches, “research evidence” automatically equates to “what I should do in practice”. This, however, is simply not true. EBP/EIP rests in the triad intersection between the best available research with your professional expertise as the practitioner alongside the client’s individual values, needs, and context.

Author: 
Melissa Cheyney PhD, CPM, LDM

Questions about the education levels and routes to certification for Certified Professional Midwives often play a role in policy discussions about birth providers, but little current evidence has been available to inform these conversations. 

A new article in the Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health takes a close look at data from the NARM 2011 Survey. We asked Melissa Cheyney, lead author of the article, to share with us this FAQ. This piece was developed to inform midwives, consumers, and policy makers on the outcomes.

Midwives Alliance of North America, in collaboration with ICTC, ICAN, and Elephant Circle is releasing this Executive Summary of Existing Research on Racial Disparities in Birth Outcomes and Racial Discrimination as an Independent Risk Factor Affecting Maternal, Infant, and Child Health. This infographic graphically depicts key findings and offers solutions.

Author: 
Melissa Cheyney PhD, CPM, LDM
Jeanette McCulloch, IBCLC

“Planned Home VBAC in the United States, 2004–2009: Outcomes, Maternity Care Practices, and Implications for Shared Decision Making” came out on August 26th as an e-pub ahead of print in the journal Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care. It provides a much-needed analysis of VBACs in the home setting in the United States. 

 

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