home birth research

Home Birth Research Featured at MomsRising.org

Consumers now have a new resource to help them learn about recent research on risk factors and community (home and birth center) birth. Jeanette McCulloch interviewed Missy Cheyney, PhD, CPM, in this recent blog post at MomsRising.org. 

Please consider sharing the post HERE and leaving a comment thanking MomsRising.org for sharing information about community birth!

In the past month, two new studies have been released - one in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), the other in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) - examining out-of-hospital birth outcomes. The CMAJ study examined 2006-09 provincial health records while the NEJM study analyzed two years of Oregon vital statistics data.

There are many defining moments in a woman's life, but few carry more weight than the day she is born into motherhood. Seeing her child for the first time after the nine months the baby has grown inside her body is elating, and it changes her- whether she's experiencing it for the first time or the seventh time. No birth story is ever the same, and each is unique and compelling.

We’ve had lots of questions from families, midwives, and others about the recent release of two articles that were based on the Midwives Alliance of North America dataset (MANA Stats). Here are answers to some common questions, along with a roundup of some of the coverage.

by Geradine Simkins, CNM, MSN, Executive Director, Midwives Alliance of North America

We’re incredibly excited to tell you that on January 30th, next Thursday, the much-anticipated outcomes from our MANA Stats 2004-2009 dataset will be publicly released.  

Two articles will be published in the upcoming Journal of Midwifery & Women’s Health: one describes the MANA Stats system and how it works, and the other describes the outcomes of planned home births with midwives between 2004 and 2009.  

Have you been following the debate about the recent press release by the authors of a new study, suggesting that babies born at home had a 10-fold higher death rate than babies born in the hospital?

We hope you'll check out today's Science and Sensibility post, where Wendy Gordon shares with Lamaze's readers "why the recent home birth research using 5 minute Apgar scores does not produce reliable data that consumers can use to make a decision on where they would like to give birth."

by Wendy Gordon, CPM, LM, MPH, member of the Coordinating Council of the MANA Division of Research

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