Midwives & the Law

There are approximately 15,000 practicing midwives in the United States.  

Midwives may practice in private homes, clinics, birth centers, and hospitals. In most countries, midwives are primary health care providers and the central pillar in maternity care and women’s health care. However, slightly more than 10% of births in the U.S. are attended by midwives. Countries that utilize midwives as primary health care providers are also those countries in which mothers and infants fare best. The United States continues to rank behind most of the developed world in terms of infant and maternal mortality.

Types of Midwives

In the United States there are several pathways to midwifery education and training. Most pathways result in midwifery certification and qualify the candidate for licensing in her/his state or municipality.

Legal Status of U.S. Midwives

In the United States there are several pathways to midwifery education and training. Most pathways result in midwifery certification and qualify the candidate for licensing in her/his state or municipality.

State By State

A list of midwifery resources and information about the midwifery laws in each U.S. state or territory.

How to Find and Afford a Lawyer

If you are accused of a crime, the U.S. Constitution guarantees you the right to be represented by a lawyer in any case in which you could be incarcerated for six months or more. State constitutions may guarantee that right for lesser crimes. People do not have a right to a free lawyer in civil legal matters. Several “legal aid” programs offer inexpensive or free legal services to those in need.